Military response

War games: 9/11 exercises offer too many coincidences

By Craig McKee

It was the first thing that made me suspicious.

At 8:21 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001, it was clear that unknown parties had hijacked American Airlines Flight 11 from Boston to Los Angeles. Fighters were unable to intercept the plane before it crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center at 8:46. Seventeen minutes later, United Airlines Flight 175, also a Boston to Los Angeles run, hit the South Tower.

How could these planes reach their targets without encountering any opposition from the incredibly powerful and expensive U.S. military? Under normal circumstances, they couldn’t. But this day was anything but typical. In fact, nothing – from protocol to the laws of physics – operated as it should have on 9/11.

By the time the second tower had been hit, it was already known that American Airlines Flight 77 out of Washington D.C. had been hijacked. That flight, too, managed to fly around the northeast United States for more than 40 minutes before it allegedly flew into the (more…)