Month: August 2012

Lone-nut scenario implanted in Colorado shooting, Holmes convicted by media

In his initial court appearance, Holmes appeared to have no idea what was happening.

 

By Craig McKee

The official story is set within hours – sometimes even minutes.

We saw it with the Kennedy assassination(s), the Oklahoma City Bombing, 9/11, and many other proven conspiracies. Now we’re seeing it with the Colorado “Dark Knight” shooting that took place in an Aurora movie theatre on July 20.

Once the official narrative is set, it will rarely change substantially. New details will emerge but the initial story that we’ve been fed is locked in.

The official story of the shootings (in which 12 died and 58 were injured) is that 24-year-old neuroscience student James Holmes was mentally disturbed and acted alone. This is echoed in the media with few exceptions. Any information contradicting the official spin was, and continues to be, buried. Essential questions are not asked.

In the Colorado shooting, the media have focused on whether it was too easy for the suspect to get the weapons he allegedly used. They have questioned whether his psychiatrist told authorities of her concerns about Holmes’s mental state and whether she notified police. They have questioned whether the University of Colorado should have seen the potential for Holmes to commit a violent act and taken preventative action.

Despite early reports that the shooter may have had at least one accomplice, the media have stuck to the script, (more…)

Contrived ridicule of conspiracy theories really means ‘Stop questioning, stop thinking’

Mel Gibson in Conspiracy Theory: just because he’s paranoid doesn’t mean everybody isn’t out to get him.

“Now it’s conspiracy – they’ve made that something that should not even be entertained for a minute, that powerful people might get together and have a plan. Doesn’t happen, you’re a kook, you’re a conspiracy buff!” – George Carlin

By Craig McKee

Every time someone makes fun of the idea of “conspiracy theories” they are exhibiting a conditioned response – like salivating when they hear a bell or believing a TV news program.

When someone asks me if I’m into conspiracy theories, I like to steal from Michael Moore and say, “Only the ones that are true.”

When I’m feeling a bit more energetic, I explain to this person that I’m interested in facts and evidence, and that the label “conspiracy theory” has been deliberately turned into a joke to (more…)